Original Article

Analysis of maxillofacial fractures pattern in a tertiary hospital in Bangladesh: A retrospective study of 329 cases

AFM S. Rahman , Ismat A. Haider, Md. Hur. Rashid

AFM S. Rahman
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rajshahi Medical College, Bangladesh. Email: raselblackpearl@gmail.com

Ismat A. Haider
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dhaka Dental College and Hospital, Bangladesh

Md. Hur. Rashid
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dhaka Dental College and Hospital, Bangladesh
Online First: December 01, 2021 | Cite this Article
Rahman, A., Haider, I., Rashid, M. 2021. Analysis of maxillofacial fractures pattern in a tertiary hospital in Bangladesh: A retrospective study of 329 cases. Journal of Dentomaxillofacial Science 6(3): 164-168. DOI:10.15562/jdmfs.v6i3.1129


Objective: The purpose of this retrospective study was to reveal the pattern of maxillofacial fractures in a tertiary hospital in Bangladesh. 

Materials and Methods: A sum of 329 cases with maxillofacial trauma was treated in the inpatient department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of Dhaka Dental College Hospital from January 2016 to December 2018. The outcome variables included age, gender, etiology and anatomic site of fractures.

Results: The age range was 4-82 years with peak frequency occurring in the age group 21-30 years. The mean age was 28.08 ± 14.77 (Mean ± SD) years. The male to female ratio was 4.98: 1. We observed that, 80.85% cases encountered from road traffic accidents (RTAs) followed by assault (8.51%). The mandible (61.7%) was predominantly affected bone followed by zygomatic complex (9.71%), midface (9.42%). The body (35.78%) was the commonest site of mandibular fracture followed by the parasymphysis (23.32%), angle (17.57%) and condyle (14.07%). The least affected site was the ramus (0.4%) and the coronoid (0.64%) process. In midface fractures, the zygomaticomaxillary complex (ZMC) was the most susceptible area (25.40% of midface) followed by maxilla (24.60%). In a nutshell, the incidence of mandibular and zygomatic complex fractures was predominant among maxillofacial fractures.

Conclusion: Young men were predominantly affected in maxillofacial trauma, as they were involved in outside activities mostly. Road traffic rules should be strictly implemented. Awareness of safety guidelines should be executed by campaigning. In a nutshell, the incidence of mandibular and zygomatic complex fractures was predominant among all the maxillofacial fractures.

References

Bither S, Mahindra U, Halli R, et al. Incidence and pattern of mandibular fractures in rural population: a review of 324 patients at a tertiary hospital in Loni, Maharashtra, India. Dent Traumatol 2008;24: 468-470.

Olusanya A, Adeleye A, Aladelusi T, et al. Updates on the epidemiology and pattern of traumatic maxillofacial injuries in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital: A 12-month prospective cohort in-hospital outcome study. Craniomaxillofac Trauma Reconstr 2015;8: 50-58.

Tugaineyo E, Odhiambo W, Akama M, et al. Aetiology, pattern and management of oral and maxillofacial injuries at Mulago national referral hospital. East Afr Med J 2012;89: 351-358.

Adi M, Ogden G, Chisholm D. An analysis of mandibular fractures in Dundee, Scottland (1977 to 1985). Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1990;28: 194-199.

Kyrgidis A, Koloutsos G, Kommata A, et al. Incidence, aetiology, treatment outcome and complications of maxillofacial fractures. A retrospective study from Northern Greece. J Cranio-Maxillofac Surg 2013;41: 637-643.

Boffano P, Roccia F, Zavattero E, et al. European Maxillofacial Trauma (EURMAT) project: A multicentre and prospective study. J Cranio-Maxillofac Surg 2015;43: 62-70.

Oruç M, I?ik V, Kankaya Y, et al. Analysis of fractured mandible over two decades. J Cranio-Maxillofac Surg 2016;27: 1457-1461.

Agarwal P, Mehrotra D, Agarwal R, et al. Patterns of maxillofacial fractures in Uttar Pradesh, India. Craniomaxillofac Trauma Reconstr 2017;10: 48-55.

Singaram MGS, Udhayakumar R. Prevalence, pattern, etiology, and management of maxillofacial trauma in a developing country: a retrospective study. J Korean Assoc Oral Maxillofac Surg 2016;42: 174.

Hächl O, Tuli T, Schwabegger A, et al. Maxillofacial trauma due to work-related accidents. Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2002;31: 90-93.

Ahmed H, Jaber M, Abu-Fanas S, et al. The pattern of maxillofacial fractures in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates: A review of 230 cases. Oral Surg, Oral Med, Oral Pathol, Oral Radiol, and Endodontol 2004;98: 166-170.

Shah A, Bangash Z, Khan T, et al. The pattern of maxillofacial trauma & its management. J Dent Oral Disord Ther 2016;4: 1-6.

Agarwal P, Mehrotra D, Agarwal R, et al. Patterns of Maxillofacial Fractures in Uttar Pradesh, India. Craniomaxillofac Trauma Reconstr 2017;10: 48-55.

Ansari M. Maxillofacial fractures in Hamedan province, Iran: a retrospective study (1987–2001). J Cranio-Maxillofac Surg 2004;32: 28-34.

Ugboko V, Odusanya S, Fagade O. Maxillofacial fractures in a semi-urban Nigerian teaching hospital. Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1998;27: 286-289.

Mijiti A, Ling W, Tuerdi M, et al. Epidemiological analysis of maxillofacial fractures treated at a university hospital, Xinjiang, China: a 5-year retrospective study. J Cranio-Maxillofac Surg 2014;42: 227-233.

Udeabor S, Akinbami B, Yarhere K, et al. Maxillofacial fractures: etiology, pattern of presentation, and treatment in University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. J Dent Surg 2014;2014: 1-5.


No Supplementary Material available for this article.
Article Views      : 75
PDF Downloads : 35