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Differences of salivary urea levels in plaque-induced gingivitis and periodontally healthy patients in Periodontology Clinic of The Faculty of Dentistry North Sumatera University (USU) Medan

Abstract

Objective: This study aims to know the difference of urea levels in saliva of plaque-induced gingivitis patients and in healthy patients at the Periodontology Clinic of Faculty of Dentistry USU.Material and Methods: This analytical study used a spectrophotometer to see urea levels in 30 salivary samples of gingivitis patients and healthy patients.Results:  After the samples were analyzed, it was found that the urea level in saliva of gingivitis patients was higher with the mean score of 52.062 g/dL whereas the urea level in saliva of healthy patients was 26.614 g/dL. The results of this study are in line with several studies conducted using various methods and samples.Conclusion: The urea level in saliva of plaque-induced gingivitis patients was significantly higher when compared with healthy patients.
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How to Cite

Nasution, A. H., & Babu, S. S. (2018). Differences of salivary urea levels in plaque-induced gingivitis and periodontally healthy patients in Periodontology Clinic of The Faculty of Dentistry North Sumatera University (USU) Medan. Journal of Dentomaxillofacial Science, 3(2), 112–114. https://doi.org/10.15562/jdmfs.v3i2.757

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